In Need of a Wide-Angle Lens

October 8, 2008
Taking a picture in the great out-of-doors often requires stitching pictures together.

Visual Viewpoint: Scenery in New Zealand Always Presents a Photo Opportunity

This entry could also be filed as one of my “visual viewpoints” you may have seen in earlier posts.

Countryside in South Island New Zealand

I’m slowly learning how to take a series of pictures and string them together, but this is the best I could do at the time. Obviously I need to learn how to get the horizons lined up. Anyway, you get the idea.

There were several spots along the road where I would insist my husband stop the car and let me take a picture. Despite the reversed travel directions, we did fairly well on the roads with our rental car and particularly liked the traffic circles, which New Zealanders seem to know how to maneuver better than Americans.

When looking at Wikipedia just now in wanting to be correct in using the term traffic circle, I found that “a roundabout is a type of road junction at which traffic enters a one-way stream around a central island. In the United States it is technically called a modern roundabout, to emphasize the distinction from the older, larger type of traffic circle.” But something I found most interesting was that, “Overall, roundabouts are statistically safer than both traffic circles and traditional intersections,with the exception that cyclists have a significantly increased crash
rate at large roundabouts. Roundabouts do not cope as well with the traffic on motorways, highways, or similar fast roads.”

No matter whether or not you like roundabouts, I’ll bet you’d do well driving a car in New Zealand, if for no other reason than that you can take yourself to glorious places like the scene above, stop, get out, and take a picture — without disturbing the travel guide’s schedule that stops only at the places he or she thinks are worth stopping at.

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