Have You Forgotten a Long-ago Spiritual Experience?

What happens when you cannot give words  to a profound personal experience?

sunset-KasumiSeveral months ago I introduced you to John Koenig, creator of the Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows. This is a compendium of invented words to express common but strangely powerful experiences for which we don’t yet have words.

Although there is no video with today’s word, exulansis, he defines it this way:

the tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it—whether through envy or pity or simple foreignness—which allows it to drift away from the rest of your life story, until the memory itself feels out of place, almost mythical, wandering restlessly in the fog, no longer even looking for a place to land.

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5 Star Spiritual Best Seller – A Gift from Support4Change Limited Time!

May 17, 2013
This is the last chance to get a free Kindle book that can help you discover what life may be trying to tell you.

Waking Up: Learning What Your Life is Trying to Teach You
This is just a brief reminder that the last of five days for a FREE Amazon Bestseller . . .

Waking Up: Learning What Your Life is Trying to Tell You by John Earle

. . . will be May 18.

The following reviews give you an idea of what this book can do for you:

“The difference in my existence before reading this book and in where I am today after applying its wisdom and guidance is staggering in a beautiful way.” – James Clem

“John Earle presents this incredibly valuable material in a way that keeps the reader excited to go on, to learn more and to work to become more conscious. What strikes me the most is the way we, as readers, are able to immediately apply what is written to our lives.” – Arthur Rose

“John Earle’s Waking Up has earned a place on the top shelf of my bookcase, right between Joseph Murphy’s Power of the Subconscious Mind and Eckart Tolle’s Power of Now and A New Earth because of the powerful and practical methods it provides for opening the heart and raising consciousness. I’ve made Waking Up my morning reading habit …both literally and figuratively. It is at the top of my recommended reading list to those I care about.” — Penny Ripple

If these ideas resonate with you, you only have another day to receive this book at no cost.

Waking Up: Learning What Your Life is Trying to Tell You, for absolutely FREE from Amazon — for FIVE DAYS ONLY. May 14 to May 18.

Here is the link for the free book: http://wakingupkindle.weebly.com/

 

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Books on My Shelf: Essential Spirituality

February 11, 2013
The book Essential Spirituality offers exercises that will help you improve your quality of life.

 

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A ”Fond Farewell” Article

When I changed Support4Change to a new format, I needed to delete some articles that didn’t fit in the new site but were too good to completely throw away. So I have moved many of them here to the blog, where they will still be available and people can find them by using tags. Enjoy.

Today’s Fond Farewell is by the late Chris Burdett-Parr, who played an invaluable part in the early days of Support4Change.

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Books on my shelfBooks on My Shelf
From time to time I will give you excerpts and recommendations for books I have enjoyed very much. Some are serious, others light reading. Some are still in print, others not so but still worth getting from the library. Or, they can be ideas to add to your holiday shopping list.
 
If you buy these books using the links in the post, you can help support the upkeep of the Support4Change website and blog. Even if you aren’t planning on buying them, I still think you will enjoy reading the excerpts and my thoughts on these excellent books.

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Essential Spirituality: The 7 Central Practices to Awaken Heart and Mind by Roger Walsh, M.D., Ph.D.

Review by Chris Burdett-Parr


This marvelous book has particular resonance with me for several reasons — the first of which is the way in which it defines and addresses the subject of love. The second reason is contained in the book’s subtitle: Exercises from the World’s Religions to Cultivate Kindness, Love, Joy, Peace, Vision, Wisdom, and Generosity.

Essential Spirituality truly does encompass, in a wonderfully refreshing and knowledgeable fashion, the world’s religions when addressing the challenges we all wrestle with as thinking and feeling human beings — fear, anger, motivation, happiness, gratitude, love, ethics, wisdom, awareness, peace, and as this quote illustrates, one of my personal favorites — the balance between science and spirituality:

There is no war between mature spirituality with its emphasis on directly testing claims and practices for ourselves, and mature science, with its similar emphasis on direct observation and testing. Consequently we can, and should, take note of relevant findings from modern science whenever they throw light on spirituality. Psychology in particular is now exploring relevant areas such as meditation, states of consciousness, and transpersonal development. These studies have thrown light on how spiritual practices work, confirmed some of their benefits, and led to the birth of “transpersonal psychology,” a field of psychology dedicated to integrating perennial wisdom and modern science. Essential Spirituality includes contemporary ideas and research findings wherever they illuminate spiritual practices. This makes possible a new way to assess spiritual claims.

Those of us lucky enough to have experienced love (whether giving or receiving) in its most powerful form — unconditional, infinite and profound — may have, along with many of the most brilliant minds in history, tried to define it adequately.

Rumi, the thirteenth century poet described it this way: “. . . love is the astrolabe that sights into the mysteries of God,” and in the same poem: “. . . if you want to expound on love, take your intellect out and let it lie down in the mud. It’s no help.”*

I found this book to come the closest to a satisfying definition of love that I have read in a long time:

Even at this stage, we think of love as only an emotion generated by and limited to our own minds. Yet many of the great religions paint a very different picture of love because at its deepest, love becomes so profound, so awesome, that it seems as much divine as human. This love is not personal but transpersonal, not only part of us but also part of the cosmos, not limited to our individual minds but part of the universal Mind, Spirit, or God. In fact, love may be a fundamental aspect of the very nature of reality, perhaps even, as the Encyclopedia of Religion summarizes it, “the single most potent force in the universe, a cosmic impulse that creates, maintains, directs, informs, and brings to its proper end every living thing.

* From The Essential Rumi, New Expanded Edition, HarperCollins: 302 pp.

 

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A Christmas Version of I Corinthians 13

December 13, 2012
A reflection on remembering the real meaning of Christmas when preparing for the holiday. 
 

Girl's choir celebrating Santa Lucia

The following is a reminder of the meaning of Christmas and the power of love to overcome our holiday frenzy of shopping, cooking and cleaning.

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If I decorate my house perfectly with plaid bows, strands of twinkling lights and shiny balls, but do not show love to my family, I’m just another decorator.

If I slave away in the kitchen, baking dozens of Christmas cookies, preparing gourmet meals and arranging a beautifully adorned table at mealtime, but do not show love to my family, I’m just another cook.

If I work at the soup kitchen, carol in the nursing home and give all that I have to charity, but do not show love to my family, it profits me nothing.

If I trim the spruce with shimmering angels and crocheted snowflakes, attend a myriad of holiday parties and sing in the choir’s cantata but do not focus on Christ, I have missed the point.

Love stops the cooking to hug the child.

Love sets aside the decorating to kiss the husband.

Love is kind, though harried and tired.

Love doesn’t envy another’s home that has coordinated Christmas china and table linens.

Love doesn’t yell at the kids to get out of the way, but is thankful they are there to be in the way.

Love doesn’t give only to those who are able to give in return but rejoices in giving to those who can’t.

Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

Love never fails.

Video games will break, pearl necklaces will be lost, golf clubs will rust, but giving the gift of love will endure.

— Author Unknown

 Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
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Does God Look Over the Little Things?

September 6, 2012
Are the “little things” we do God’s Providence?

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A ”Fond Farewell” Article

When I changed Support4Change to a new format, I needed to delete some articles that didn’t fit in the new site but were too good to completely throw away. So I have moved many of them here to the blog, where they will still be available and people can find them by using tags. Enjoy.

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When I received the following e-mail forwarded from a friend, the conclusion was not quite that of the anonymous author. While I agree that life is nothing much more than “little things” that stand between us and either disaster or fortune, I find it hard to say that God “watched over” those who didn’t make it to work on Sept. 11, 2001 because it makes me question whether He withdrew his eye from the lives of those who got to work and were killed in the World Trade Center offices.

Perhaps it makes us feel better to think that God has a hand in everything we do. Do we feel this way because it gives us comfort?

Band aid sheer
THE LITTLE THINGS

After Sept. 11th, one company invited the remaining members of other companies who had been decimated by the attack on the Twin Towers to share their available office space. At a morning meeting, the head of security told stories of why these people were alive….. and all the stories were just little.

As you might know, the head of the company got in late that day because his son started kindergarten.

Another fellow was alive because it was his turn to bring donuts.

One woman was late because her alarm clock didn’t go off in time.

One was late because of being stuck on the NJ Turnpike because of an auto accident.

One of them missed his bus.

One spilled food on her clothes and had to take time to change.

One’s car wouldn’t start.

One went back to answer the telephone.

One had a child that dawdled and didn’t get ready as soon as he should have.

One couldn’t get a taxi.

The one that struck me was the man who put on a new pair of shoes that morning, took the various means to get to work but before he got there, he developed a blister on his foot. He stopped at a drugstore to buy a Band-Aid. That is why he is alive today.

Now when I am stuck in traffic, miss an elevator,turn back to answer a ringing telephone . . . all the little things that annoy me. I think to myself, this is exactly where God wants me to be at this very moment.

Next time your morning seems to be going wrong, the children are slow getting dressed, you can’t seem to find the car keys, and you hit every traffic light, don’t get mad or frustrated; know that God is at work watching over you.

May God continue to bless you with all those annoying little things and may you remember their possible purpose.

What do you think? Please comment below to let me know.

 Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

 

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