Who Are Your Personal Heroes and Heroines?

Expand relationships by asking yourself questions about who your personal heroes and heroines

If you are new to this feature of the Support4Change Blog, here are some suggestions for exploring questions for yourself and also for your family and friends.

Heroes are made by the paths they choose, not the powers they are graced with. ― Brodi AshtonEverneath

♦ • ♦ • ♦

My own heroes are the dreamers, those men and women who tried to make the world a better place than when they found it, whether in small ways or great ones. Some succeeded, some failed, most had mixed results… but it is the effort that’s heroic, as I see it. Win or lose, I admire those who fight the good fight. ― George R.R. Martin

♦ • ♦ • ♦

Read More

How Hard Have You Worked for Power and Prestige?

Expand relationships by asking questions your personality

Note: If you are new to this feature of the Support4Change Blog, here are some suggestions for exploring questions for yourself and also for your family and friends.


I try to keep in my mind the simple question: Am I trying to do good or make myself look good? Too many of our responsibilities get added to our plate when we are trying to please people, impress people, prove ourselves, acquire power, increase our prestige. All those motivations are about looking good more than doing good. — Kevin DeYoung

♦ • ♦ • ♦

War will exist until that distant day when the conscientious objector enjoys the same reputation and prestige that the warrior does today. — John F. Kennedy

♦ • ♦ • ♦

Fame is part of me and my life as an actor. I enjoy the creative aspects of my life as an actor. I enjoy directing and acting as well. But the bottom line for me is not prestige and power. It’s about having an exciting, creative life. — Matt Dillon


The questions in this post are designed to help you explore whether you strive for power and prestige — and what it would mean to you if you achieved the highest position one could have in business, entertainment, politics, fashion, and so forth. Read More

How Much Do You Feel Empathy for Others?

Expand relationships by asking questions about the meaning of life

Note: If you are new to this feature of the Support4Change Blog, here are some suggestions for exploring questions for yourself and also for your family and friends.


When we honestly ask ourselves which person in our lives mean the most to us, we often find that it is those who, instead of giving advice, solutions, or cures, have chosen rather to share our pain and touch our wounds with a warm and tender hand. The friend who can be silent with us in a moment of despair or confusion, who can stay with us in an hour of grief and bereavement, who can tolerate not knowing, not curing, not healing and face with us the reality of our powerlessness, that is a friend who cares. ― Henri J.M. NouwenOut of Solitude: Three Meditations on the Christian Life

♦ • ♦ • ♦

The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen. ― Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

♦ • ♦ • ♦

Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. ― Leo Buscaglia

♦ • ♦ • ♦

Resolve to be tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving, and tolerant of the weak and the wrong. Sometime in life you will have been all of these. ― Lloyd ShearerWalter Scott’s Personality Parade


We see a child being bullied and come to his rescue because we have been bullied and know what he feels. We may find it a bit harder to connect with the feelings of someone who is experiencing something that we have not.

However, we don’t need to be a battered wife to know she is experiencing pain. We, too, have been in situations that seemed to have no easy exit. So as we open our hearts, we know the human condition provides us with many chances to feel compassion and empathy with others.

Today there is only a simple question to help you recognize how much you are able to understand and share the feelings of another. 

Explore What Quality You Think Makes Us Human by Asking Yourself This Question

It can take a lot of effort to try and understand people who are very different from me and sometimes it’s easy to just dismiss someone as “different” and move on. Other times I want to really get to know a person who seems boring or difficult.

To what extent do I genuinely attempt to get inside “the very shell” of another person so that I might truly understand them?

What have you learned about yourself in exploring this question?
What have you learned about your friends if they have explored this question with you?

What Do You Worry Most About?

THIS POST ORIGINALLY APPEARED ON THIS BLOG IN OCTOBER 2014. DUE TO A SERVER FAILURE, IT WAS LOST. IT IS REPOSTED HERE.


Expand relationships by asking questions about managing emotions

Note: If you are new to this feature of the Support4Change Blog, here are some suggestions for exploring questions for yourself and also for your family and friends.

Worry gives a small thing a big shadow. —Swedish Proverb

♦ • ♦ • ♦

One of ten “symptoms of inner peace,” which include frequent acts of smiling and a tendency to think and act spontaneously rather than on fears based on past experience, is: “an inability to worry (this is a very serious symptom!). — Source Unknown

Read More

What Makes Us Human

Deepen relationships by asking questions about what makes us human

Note: If you are new to this feature of the Support4Change Blog, here are some suggestions for exploring questions for yourself and also for your family and friends.

The most satisfactory definition of man from the scientific point of view is probably Man the Tool-maker. —Kenneth Page Oakley
…..[Note: He wrote this well before we observed some animals making and using use tools, but man definitely has the corner on complex tools.]

♦ • ♦ • ♦

For him the tragedy of Homo sapiens is that the least fit to survive breed the most. —John Fowles

♦ • ♦ • ♦

Read More