Three Posts You May Have Missed

July 9, 2013
Enjoy these “classic” posts from the Support4Change blog.

Arlene has been active on the internet providing helpful articles and inspiration for over 15 years. She has been blogging since 2006, and written over 350 posts. There are so many gems hidden among the archives, that I wanted to share a few of them with you. They cover a range of topics, and span the last 7 years.

–Renee Payan Wong
Webmaster, Support4Change

How to Know If You Are Living With a Perfectionist
May 26, 2010

Are the standards that your partner (or parent, sibling or friend) has for herself, and for you, too high, or do you not appreciate the need to do a better job of what needs to be done?

This is the first in a series of articles on Living With a Perfectionist.

 


 

The Secret

Where is the “Secret” in THE SECRET? – Part One
May 20, 2007

What is there about the book “The Secret” that convinces people that whatever they have in their life is something they have caused?

This is the first of two posts.


 

Eco SafariCuriosity Can Build a Better World
January 12, 2007

Discover the value of asking questions no matter where you are.

 

 

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On Paying Attention to What You See

August 8, 2011
How carefully do you notice what is happening around you?

A few years ago I started something I called Visual Viewpoints. This was a way to suggest that you could tell something about a person by the pictures they share, based on where they choose to stand to take the picture and the subject they select.

Don’t know what, exactly, my pictures say about me, but they offer you a glimpse into the kinds of things I am interested in capturing on film (well, on tiny digital memory cards anyway)

Interesting patterns of white on mountain is ItalyIn the case of the picture on the right, I was flying over the alps from Italy to Munich a few years ago. What puzzled me were the patches of white against the dark ground. It looks as though this is snow on a hiking trail, or perhaps on a ski run, but it is only the beginning of November.

Yet if it is snow, why would there be only white in these lines but not in the deep valleys Why are there breaks in the white, as though there is a deep hole filled with snow? But there wasn’t much snow on the mountains as a whole, so why did the “snow” create a pattern like this? There are other areas that are in the shadow more than these appear to be and I assume they would continue to have snow, so what makes these areas special?

I am puzzled by this and offer it here in the hope that someone who reads this page will explain it. My interest in it is a little like that of members of the Google Earth Community who examine Google Earth pictures to find anomalies that are interesting to them.

There are many who would look at this and only think of it as a beautiful mountain scene. If they noticed the white at all, they would ignore it or file it as an-unknown-thing-not-worth-pursuing. Yet doesn’t it puzzle you? Don’t you wonder what it means?

I share this to encourage you look with a bit more questioning eyes at the world around you, including pictures in print and TV. And then, when you see something that is a puzzle, that you try to find out what it is. There are a zillion things that I don’t know the why of, but whenever I take the time to see what they might be, when I ask questions about “why” they are the way they appear—even if I don’t find the answer—the mere fact that I’ve tried enriches my life.

If you know someone who might have an explanation for this picture, please let me know how I can get in touch with him or her.

What about you? How do you view the world? What is your viewpoint?

When you look around you, besides needing to watch where you are going as you navigate the world without running into something, are you interested in what you’re seeing?

When there is something you haven’t seen before, do you try to understand what it is, or do you let it become just one more thing that is a puzzle not pursued?

Finally, are you willing to pay attention this week to at least one thing that you haven’t known how it is made, why it looks the way the does, or its possible purpose—and then actually pursue the answer?

Sharpen Mental Skills and Collect Memories

July 29, 2010
On vacation (or when you get home), play this game to sharpen your mental skills and help you collect memories for the future.

Alps from the airThere are two parts to this post’s Take-a-Break: curiosity and memory.

Develop Curiosity

An illustration for this first part is a picture I took while flying over the alps from Italy to Munich in early November 2007. I was puzzled by the patches of white against the dark ground. It looks as though this is snow on a hiking trail, or perhaps on a ski run, but it is only the beginning of November. Yet if it is snow, why would there be only white in these lines but not in the deep valleys?

There isn’t much snow yet on the peaks, so why are there breaks in the white, as though there are a deep holes filled with snow? If there wasn’t much snow on the mountains as a whole, why did the “snow” create a pattern like this? There are other areas that are in the shadow more than these appear to be and I assume they would continue to have snow, so what makes these areas special?

My interest in the photo is a little like that of members of the Google Earth Community who examine Google Earth pictures to find anomalies that are interesting to them. Look at an enlarged picture if you think that would help — and tell me if you have the answer.

Of course, there are many who would look at this and only think of it as a beautiful mountain scene. If they noticed the white at all, they would ignore it or file it as an-unknown-thing-not-worth-pursuing. Yet doesn’t it puzzle you? Don’t you wonder what it means?

What I’d like to suggest is that whatever you look at this summer (and of course, for the rest of the year as well), you look with questioning eyes. This could include pictures in print and on TV. Then, when you see something that is a puzzle, try to find out what it is.

There are a zillion things that I don’t know the why of, but whenever I take the time to see what they might be, when I ask questions about “why” they are the way they appear — even if I don’t find the answer — the mere fact that I’ve tried enriches my life.

Pay attention to at least one thing that you haven’t known how it is made, why it looks the way it does, or its possible purpose. Then pursue the answer.

Memory Recall Suggestion

The second suggestion for this take-a-break is to test your recall memory. For example:

If you look out the window of a plane, take a moment (15 seconds will do) to capture with your mind as much as you can. Then close your eyes and see how much you remember and open them again to notice what you missed. You’ll have to do this quickly, of course, since the plane is going so fast.

This is an interesting way to sharpen my mind when it’s feeling a little sluggish. And I think it helps when I play a game called pelmanism on the Internet that you may also enjoy. This is a memory card game in which a pack of cards is spread out face down and players try to turn up pairs with the same symbol. I use the easiest form with 12 pairs of animals. It helps me to make up a story about them as I go along, usually based on the first animal that appears. Try it. Keep your brain cells engaged.

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Here are a some related posts from this blog, and articles from the Support4Change website: