Can Time Stand Still?

September 24, 2012
Maybe having enough time to do all we want is a matter of perspective

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A ”Fond Farewell” Article

When I changed Support4Change to a new format, I needed to delete some articles that didn’t fit in the new site but were too good to completely throw away. So I have moved many of them here to the blog, where they will still be available and people can find them by using tags. Enjoy.

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Does Time Stand Still?

BY LEA BRANDENBURG
Reprinted with permission

Using modern understanding of the dimensions of time and space, this life coach presents the concept of discovering there is enough time to do everything you need to do.alarm clock

Ever notice that there are times when you feel as if time stands still? Time seems to stand still during the exquisite moments of our lives: when we see a breathtaking sunset or bask in the glow of completing a project or watching a child at play. Have you noticed that time seems more expansive when you are vacation? Can time, as we understand it, collapse?

David Bohm, a theoretical physicist, suggests that time can only be something [that] happens in the present and now, in spite of our artificial constructs of past and future, we are really beings who live in a lot of parallel concurrent nows. Time has no beginning and “the past” is actually concurrent with now.

Bohm’s central thesis is that the world and everything in it is a vast ocean of energy. What we perceive as separate parts — you, me, the chair, the dog, the trees, the air we breathe, the atmosphere surrounding the planet, and the stars in the next galaxy — are all part of a seamless whole (holomovement) that is pulsing with life and intelligence. He calls his ocean of living energy the implicate order because it cannot be seen or measured, except mathematically, only inferred.

Organizing this high-energy pool into various structures is the superimplicate order, a superinformation field that surrounds, interpenetrates, and underlies the implicate order, directing its unfolding into the relatively stable forms we perceive with our everyday senses — the stuff of the world as we know it (the explicate order). In this sea of pure energy, there are no particles, no space or time.

Space and time are properties of the three-dimensional world of the explicate order. By the rules of quantum mechanics, space and time cannot exist without someone there to measure them.

We inhabit a universe that is a seamless, coherent whole. The separation of objects is an attribute of the explicit order, as are space and time. We actually inhabit a universe where every point is interpenetrated by every other point.

This universe is made up of the implicate order, a vast ocean of living, conscious, intelligent energy underlying, surrounding, overlaying, and interpenetrating the ordinary world of our experience. And embedded in this implicate order is the superimplicate order, a vast — in fact infinite — information field, a protointelligence organizing and directing the energy of the implicate order and enfolded within it. From the implicate and superimplicate orders (of which there are an infinite number in an infinite array or spectrum) is derived the manifest world of our experience.

The world appears solid and three-dimensional, but, because it is born of the implicate and superimplicate orders, it really pulsates with intelligence that is nonlocal — everywhere at once — and that holds all of time in a co-present fashion. Since hierarchies, structures, and grids — not to mention years, days, and minutes — don’t exist at this level of subtlety, things just are, embedded within one another, with past and future events happening now. (From Your Sixth Sense: Unlocking the Power of Your Intuition by Belleruth Naparstek, pages 96-102)

I am definitely not a theoretical physicist, but I do know that there are moments in life where time does stand still, where it seems that I have more than enough time to do everything I need to do AND want to do — and more.

© 2002, Lea Brandenburg

Lea Brandenburg is president of Creating Strategies in New York, NY, and has been coaching an international group of clients and businesses since 1997. Her areas of expertise and passion are interpersonal and business communication, intuitive intelligence and creativity. She is a graduate of Coach U, the coaching industry’s premiere and oldest training program, a member of the International Coach Federation, which is an association dedicated to preserving the integrity and ethics of the coaching profession, and a Founding Member of Coachville, the first on line coaching training company and portal. You can contact her at lea@creatingstrategies.com.

 Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

 

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How to Manage the Time of Your Life

September 10, 2012
Here are a number of pratical suggestions for finding a way to navigate through the time you have available in your life.

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A ”Fond Farewell” Article

When I changed Support4Change to a new format, I needed to delete some articles that didn’t fit in the new site but were too good to completely throw away. So I have moved many of them here to the blog, where they will still be available and people can find them by using tags. Enjoy.

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The Time Of Your Life

BY LEA BRANDENBURG
Reprinted with permission

Suggestion: As you read the following, note the one to which you MOST need to pay attention.

Alarm Clock

Do you try to find time, make time, get time, buy time, squeeze more time into your day? Do you wonder how you’ll get everything you need to done, in any given day? Do you suffer from “time-deficit disorder”? Is managing time a mystery to you?

Well, you certainly aren’t alone. Many people find their relationship to time a challenge. A vexing challenge. Many of us are walking around stressed and/or overwhelmed much of the time.

There are no simple answers to creating space and time in your life. That said: you may want to try some of these suggestions as a way to navigate through the time of your life.

You can’t manage time, but you can manage yourself and the choices you make with regard to time. Does the way you use time reflect your priorities? Become aware of how you are using your time. Get a snapshot of how the 24 hours you have each day is being used. Create some sort of time log to get a clear picture of how the time you have each day is being used. Once you have this awareness and information, compare it to what you value in your life. Is how you are currently using your time in alignment with what is REALLY important to you?

When overwhelmed or over committed, ask yourself: What’s your desired outcome? What’s the next action? If nothing else gets done today, what are the one or two items that absolutely MUST be done? Have you fallen into the trap of believing that you have to do everything today? Take time to plan and prioritize.

Know what your personal rhythms are. Do your most difficult tasks when you are at your personal best. Perform less demanding work at the time of day when you are most likely to be in a slump.

With your “to-do” list, separate tasks that can be done quickly and effortlessly today, from the projects that are long term. Don’t confuse the two. Doing laundry can be completed in a day, while renovating the house can’t.

Give yourself a sense of winning/accomplishment each day. Have a doable goal for each day or week and do it. Completing things makes us feel like we are moving forward in our lives. There is a calming satisfaction when we complete an activity or project.

NO

Learn to say no. Become aware of when you are taking on too much. Learn to value your time. You have 24 hours in day, how do YOU want to use the time?

Try taking time outs. Build in short times during the day to take a step back and catch your breath. Get off automatic pilot and become aware. Once you ground yourself in the present moment, you’ll find you’ll make better decisions because you’ve stopped long enough to hear what your inner wisdom is trying to tell you.

Make appointments with yourself. If you have a big project that you need to start, set aside time for it and write it in your calendar. Set time limits on projects.

Procrastination is an energy drain. Time you could spend tackling the project you are avoiding is being spent worrying about not doing the project or feeling guilty about not doing the work. Procrastinating can also create a crisis or problem. Try to handle things before they become fires that need to be put out.

Make caring for yourself a high priority. For example, if you need eight hours of sleep a night, get them. You will function better. Just as your car will not function properly without sufficient gas, your body will not function well without enough fuel. The better you care for yourself, the more you’ll have to give to others.

© 2002, Lea Brandenburg

Lea Brandenburg is president of Creating Strategies in New York, NY, and has been coaching an international group of clients and businesses since 1997. Her areas of expertise and passion are interpersonal and business communication, intuitive intelligence and creativity. She is a graduate of Coach U, the coaching industry’s premiere and oldest training program, a member of the International Coach Federation, which is an association dedicated to preserving the integrity and ethics of the coaching profession, and a Founding Member of Coachville, the first on line coaching training company and portal. You can contact her at lea@creatingstrategies.com.

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When Observation Conflicts With Evaluation

August 30, 2012
A life coach offers her experience of interpreting an accident in New York City by adding a personal spin that didn’t fit the facts.

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A ”Fond Farewell” Article

When I changed Support4Change to a new format, I needed to delete some articles that didn’t fit in the new site but were too good to completely throw away. So I have moved many of them here to the blog, where they will still be available and people can find them by using tags. Enjoy.

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Preventing Interpretation from Getting in the Way of “Just the Facts, Ma’am”

BY LEA BRANDENBURG
Reprinted with permission

In the late 60’s there was a TV show about the Los Angeles Police Department called “Dragnet”. One of the lead characters became known for saying: Just the facts, ma’am. Anytime he would interview someone and that person would start to tell his or her story he would remind them: Just the facts. What Detective Webb understood is that when someone tells a story they are giving their interpretation of the facts. The facts of a situation don’t change, but how they are perceived and then spoken about depends on who is telling the story.

Here’s an example of how this worked in my life recently:

Last spring I was walking down a Manhattan street and witnessed something odd, even by New York City standards. I was enjoying the beauty of this particular spring day and became aware of lots of car horns honking. The sound of loud car horns and irate drivers are not unusual in New York. In fact, that kind of noise is the norm in New York. What happened next was unusual, even by New York standards.

Manhattan New York City 2008 PD a85A man came out of an large apartment building, got into a truck that was blocking traffic in the street, which in turn was causing all the car honking and shouting. The driver proceeded to start the truck, backed up into a truck that was behind it, shifted gears and started moving forward. The truck then veered sharply to the right running over a motorcycle, moved a concrete planter that housed a tree and eventually hit the wall of the apartment building he had just come out of moments before.

As I stood watching this scene unfold, my first thought was gratitude that I wasn’t walking on the other side of the street. The next thought that occurred to me was that this man had snapped. The yelling drivers and car horns had succeeded in pushing him over the edge. I thought I had just witnessed was going to be that evening’s lead news story. “Good evening ladies and gentleman. Welcome to tonight’s 5 o’clock report. Mild mannered truck driver goes berserk.”

When I came back an hour later and spoke with a policeman, I found out that there was a different interpretation for this set of circumstances. The truck driver’s assistant (the man I saw come out of the building), hearing the horns and commotion out on the street wanted to help by moving the truck out of the way. The only drawback to his being of help in this situation is that he didn’t know how to drive the truck or have a license to drive trucks! Good intention, poor follow through.

Here was one set of facts, but two interpretations. The truck backing up, running over a motorcycle, moving a concrete planter and slamming into the side of a building — these were circumstances that anyone could observe. One set of facts and the possibility of as many interpretations as people telling the story.

In our daily communication we tend to add evaluations to our observations. People simply combine the two. We add our personal spin to whatever we are talking about. In order to create an open environment for communication, we can learn to separate evaluation from what we observe. When Detective Webb was looking for information, he wanted facts and not interpretation or evaluation. The facts, not interpretation, would help him unravel the case he was working on.

When people mix evaluation and observation communication can break down. How? For one thing, when evaluation and observation are mixed, people tend to hear it as a criticism. “You aren’t doing your work well.” This is an example of evaluation and observation mixed together. “When I see that you don’t hand in your schoolwork on time, I feel you aren’t doing quality work.” This is an example of evaluation and observation that have been separated.

Becoming aware of when you are mixing evaluation and observation when you speak will help you in the communication process. I don’t think it is possible to not observe without making evaluations or having an interpretation. I do think that we can become clear about when we are mixing evaluation with our observations. Try making this one small adjustment in the way you communicate and you may find yourself engaging in authentic communication more often.

© 2002, Lea Brandenburg

Lea Brandenburg is president of Creating Strategies in New York, NY, and has been coaching an international group of clients and businesses since 1997. Her areas of expertise and passion are interpersonal and business communication, intuitive intelligence and creativity. She is a graduate of Coach U, the coaching industry’s premiere and oldest training program, a member of the International Coach Federation, which is an association dedicated to preserving the integrity and ethics of the coaching profession, and a Founding Member of Coachville, the first on line coaching training company and portal. You can contact her at lea@creatingstrategies.com.

 Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

 

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Centering Ritual to Start the Day

August 20, 2012
A life coach discovers how to slow down and to value starting the day with a centering ritual.

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A ”Fond Farewell” Article

When I changed Support4Change to a new format, I needed to delete some articles that didn’t fit in the new site but were too good to completely throw away. So I have moved many of them here to the blog, where they will still be available and people can find them by using tags. Enjoy.

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Ten Minutes, Ten Toes — No Problem!

BY LEA BRANDENBURG
Reprinted with permission

nail polishA couple of months ago, Life gave me an unusual vehicle for personal growth. And, because the Universe I live in is filled with humor and laughter, my lessons tend to show up via unusual channels. This particular opportunity presented itself in the form of painting my toenails.

The weather had just started to turn warm and my thoughts turned to wearing the new sandals I had just bought. And from the sandals, my thoughts then turned to painting my toenails. Sandals and painted toenails, bread and butter, peanut butter and jelly, hot weather and shorts — these just go together, right? The only drawback to this particular train of thought is that I got this brilliant idea — ten minutes before I was scheduled to begin my first coaching call for that day. Ten minutes, ten toes — no problem.

With fearless abandon I went to my medicine cabinet, selected a lovely shade of pink, put my foot up on the bathroom sink and started painting away. With one foot done, I moved to bring my other foot up and somehow the nail polish applicator flew out of my hand and landed deep in the bathroom sink drain . . . brush side up. Five minutes to go until my first call.

My brain is moving a 100 MPH. All I can think about is how to get the applicator out of the drain. So, I hopped into the kitchen, grabbed a knife and started poking around the drain. That doesn’t work. Then the phone rings. It’s my client calling early! It turns out it’s a friend calling for a phone number. I’m still trying to get the top of the nail polish out of the drain, talking to my friend and desperately hoping that the phone won’t fly out from under my ear and chin where I had jammed it so my hands would be free. The phone stays put, I give my friend the number and tell her I love and that I have to get off the phone. I hop back into the kitchen and get a pair of thin pliers. They do the trick and I resumed the painting process. By the way, I’m keeping an eye on the clock the whole time. And as my newly painted right foot hits the floor, the phone rings and this time it is my client.

So, what did I learn? Well, besides how important I think it is that the color of my toes match . . . I found that I was slightly off-center the rest of that day. I learned that for me to do my best work I need to be grounded. That and, of course, don’t try to paint your nails ten minutes before you are scheduled to begin working!

How do you start your day? What kind of centering rituals do you have? Are you aware of when you’ve completed one activity or project before your begin the next thing on your agenda? Do you find yourself running from one appointment to the next? Is your day an endless stream of activity?

By using some kind of centering ritual, we can condition ourselves to move into an appropriate frame of mind to begin our day, our work or our projects. A ritual can be as simple as walking around your chair once you’ve completed one activity and before beginning the next. Develop a ritual for yourself that takes you off of automatic pilot and helps to ground you in your body and the present moment. When you are grounded, with all your energies (mental, emotional, and physical) in harmonious balance, it is much easier to focus your attention. And with this focus and clarity, you can access your inner wisdom and increase your ability to produce and create.

© 2002, Lea Brandenburg

Lea Brandenburg is president of Creating Strategies in New York, NY, and has been coaching an international group of clients and businesses since 1997. Her areas of expertise and passion are interpersonal and business communication, intuitive intelligence and creativity. She is a graduate of Coach U, the coaching industry’s premiere and oldest training program, a member of the International Coach Federation, which is an association dedicated to preserving the integrity and ethics of the coaching profession, and a Founding Member of Coachville, the first on line coaching training company and portal. You can contact her at lea@creatingstrategies.com.

 Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
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Paddle With the Current

June 18, 2012

If you sometimes feel you are swimming upstream, perhaps you are and need to turn your canoe around and face the direction you really want to go.

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A ”Fond Farewell” Article

When I changed Support4Change to a new format, I needed to delete some articles that didn’t fit in the new site but were too good to completely throw away. So I have moved many of them here to the blog, where they will still be available and people can find them by using tags. Enjoy.

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Paddle with the Current

BY LEA BRANDENBURG
Reprinted with permission

Muskoka canoe 2A couple of years ago, while my husband and I were on vacation, we decided to do a thirteen-mile canoe trip. We had a wonderful leisurely trip down the river and it is a day that I still remember fondly. At one point, I looked across the river and saw two people in another canoe working really, really hard. They were paddling against the current.

Although they were laughing about going upstream and yelling across the river to us that it was THE way to travel, they were definitely fighting against the river’s flow. They were also working a lot harder than we were on that beautiful summer day. We too were working (actually my husband did the majority of the paddling so that made the trip really easy for me); but most of the time, traveling with the current helped us and gave us the extra momentum we needed to move towards our desired destination. The only time we had any difficulty on that wonderful day was when we decided to give some ducks the right of way.

So, dear readers, have you guessed that I’m using the river as a metaphor for life? Do you have any areas in your life that you just might be paddling upstream? One of the most effective ways of connecting to the flow of your life is by making the present perfect.

Although the present may not be what you want or like, it is still perfect. Even if the present isn’t exactly what you want, you can still make the most of it by accepting your current reality. You can avoid the physical exertion involved with trying to paddle upstream and against the current, because you aren’t wishing your present were different. You’ll find that you begin to move with the current instead of fighting against it because your focus is in the present time zone (not the past or future). You will have more focus simply because your concentration and attention aren’t divided.

Again, you don’t have to like your present in order for it to be perfect. You may not like the extra 10 pounds you may be carrying around, you may not like being downsized or laid off from your last job, you may not like having to work a side job to support your acting or art or you may not like living from paycheck to paycheck, but this may be your current reality and it is perfect nonetheless. It is simply what is so. Not what could be, what should be or might be. It is what you have today and once you accept your today, you don’t have to struggle to paddle upstream anymore. You connect with flow by consciously and mindfully stepping into your today.

And when we come to accept the reality of our lives today, we have clarity about choices that are available to us. The choices you make today will affect your tomorrow. And the present you are living today was created out of the choices you made yesterday. The best way to create a wonderful future is by living well in today. The present will become the future.

Recently, a coaching colleague passed away and this moved me to write about the topic of present perfect and flow. I didn’t know her personally. Nor is it noteworthy in the larger scheme of things that she passed away, people die every day. What is particularly poignant in this situation is that she was in her early thirties. And, as sad as it is when an older person passes away, I have always found comfort in the fact that they’ve lived a long life and had an opportunity to experience much of what life can offer. Whereas someone who passes away at a relatively young age, simply hasn’t had the time to get to everything s/he plans on doing “one day”. One day simply doesn’t come when one passes away at a young age.

One advantage in accepting that your present is perfect, is that you aren’t waiting for “one day” to arrive because you are content to live in the today you’ve created. You can plan for your future, but what you live and what you experience as you plan for the future is your today. Look around you: What is waiting for your attention today? What opportunities are available to you today?

© Copyright 2002, Lea Brandenburg

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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Lea Brandenburg is president of Creating Strategies in New York, NY, and has been coaching an international group of clients and businesses since 1997. Her areas of expertise and passion are interpersonal and business communication, intuitive intelligence and creativity. She is a graduate of CoachInc, the coaching industry’s premiere and oldest training program, a member of the International Coach Federation, which is an association dedicated to preserving the integrity and ethics of the coaching profession, and a Founding Member of Coachville, the first online coaching training company and portal. You can contact her at lea@creatingstrategies.com or calling (917) 770-8215.

 

Did you enjoy this post?
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