A Walk at Sunset Offers a New Perspective on Relationships

Ladder leading to pictureThis post is part of the “Step Into Pictures” series that offers you a new way to explore both difficult relationships and those you treasure. Visit the Step Into Pictures Archive to learn more about it.

02-23-15 - Fearman-Falkner-Sunset - large

A Falkner Sunset by Lynne Fearman

Click on picture to see enlarged view

If you’ve had a bit more snow or cold where you live, you may want to pay particular attention to this picture by my friend Lynne Fearman.

It expresses far more soft, comfortable temperatures than the eastern part of the country has been having this month. That’s putting it mildly. Read More

Step Into Pictures — Breaking Dawn

May 30, 2013

. . . A New Perspective on Relationships
Number 8

Join a friend at the beginning of the day and enter a place
with all kinds of possibilities for improved relationships.

 

Ladder leading to pictureThis post is part of the “Step Into Pictures” series that offers you a new way to explore both difficult relationships and those you treasure. Visit the Step Into Pictures Archive to learn more about it.

 

Click on picture to see enlarged view
Breaking Dawn by Lynn Fearman
Breaking Dawn by Lynn Fearman

Step into this picture now, or continue reading to learn more about it . . .

The second picture in the series of Step Into Pictures was a vibrant sunset over Lake Päijänne at Sysmä, Finland. In writing about the picture, I said that I liked both sunrises and sunsets, each for different reasons. [See Step Into Pictures — Finland.]

So far, I have only given you that one sunset picture, but will give you many more. However, now I want to share a sunrise painting by my friend, Lynne Fearman.

I like this piece not only because it is a sunrise and a well done, but for two other reasons as well.

First, it has a lot of blues and I like blue. In fact, I liked the blues so much in this picture that I made the matting blue. Of course, the color in the rest of the room would help determine whether this much blue was appropriate, but I like to imagine that this painting would hang someplace where this deep blue would work.

I have not been trained in framing and perhaps someone else would choose a different way to frame this picture. The color in the rest of the room would play a role, of course, but just imagine this would be someplace where this deep blue would be appropriate.

The second reason I chose the picture was because the clouds are a bit ambiguous. I would like to think that when the sun rises higher in the sky that it will lighten the dark woods and turn the meadow into a bright place to stroll, a lovely place for having a conversation.

In my interpretation of the picture, the purple clouds will slowly fade into greys and whites, or perhaps burn away and disappear altogether. On the other hand, you may suspect that the clouds portend a rainy day and you’ll have a wet walk in the woods.

Depending on the kind of day you think this picture will turn into may affect the conversation you want to have with the person you invite into the scene. In fact, when you first enter the picture with your friend, you might want to talk about the way you sometimes — perhaps often — see the same thing in a different ways.

If you tend to be a bit pessimistic about life and relationships, perhaps this time, as you enter into an experiment in communication, you may want to choose to be positive, and join Little Annie is acknowledging that the sun will come out tomorrow for your relationship.

A New Perspective on Relationships – Sam Merrill Trail

March 21, 2013
Enjoy this Plein-air painting of a hike in the San Gabriel Mountains

 

Ladder leading to picture

This post is part of the “Step Into Pictures” series that offers you a new way to explore both difficult relationships and those you treasure. Visit the Step Into Pictures Archive to learn more about it.

 

Click to enlarge photo

Sam Merrill Trailhead

 

Step into this picture now, or continue reading to learn more about it . . .

My friend, Lynne Fearman, has been kind enough to let me use several of her pictures on Support4Change. She has been especially generous with her pictures for this feature of Stepping Into Pictures aka, A New Perspective on Relationships feature.

Like several others, this was done in the Plein-air style of painting on site. It appeals to me because this trail is in the San Gabriel mountains that are a few blocks from our house. I have done many miles in the lovely canyons that look just like this one.

On her website lynnefearman.com, you can check out other paintings she has done using this technique, where she, and other artists, set down their easels and translate the scene around them into lovely paintings.

Fire Up Your Brain With Another Story

September 26, 2011
How might you use this painting to resolve a problem or stimulate your creativity?

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We’re in London seeing as many things as we can squeeze in before we leave on Thursday.

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Riders in the southwest

In What Story Would You Tell About This Picture? I gave you a painting by the same artist who painted this picture and suggested you could use it to “fire up your brain.”

One way you can use the picture is to apply the Step Into Pictures technique to help you see some aspect of an issue that lies between you and another person; one that you may not have understood before. To do this, you:

  • Think about a situation you want resolved between you and another person.
  • Imagine you step into the picture, with or without that person.
  • What would you say?
  • What would you do?
  • If the other person is with you, what do you think he or she might say or do?
  • Let your mind be open to what might happen.
The other thing you can do is to tell a story about this picture by Lynne Fearman, which is titled simply “Riders.”
  • What does the title mean to you?
  • What does the scene say to you?
  • What do you think happened before you saw this
  • What do you think will happen next?
Gets your brain cells working, doesn’t it?In about a month, after I’ve returned from my vacation, I’ll give you another painting (or perhaps a photo I’ve taken on my trip) to see how you can again expand your brain’s creativity.

 

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