Would You Join a Virtual Choir?

July 22, 2013

This wonderful choir shows how many disparate people can create one beautiful voice.

 

On June 24, the blog post asked the question, “Would You Dance and Sing in Public?” In describing Matthew “Matt” Harding’s dancing and singing tour of the world, I said I would only do it if the group were large enough to hide my inability to either dance or sing.
Today my answer to the question of whether I would join a virtual choir is absolutely no. I would never expose the choir to my lack of talent.
The video I highlight in this post is a twist on the theme of the earlier post. Rather than having a composer travel the world to find singers who will join him, live, on stage, Eric Whitacre creates “Virtual Choir” videos. In these videos, singers from around the world and from ages 6 to 98 record his compositions and — through the marvel of the Internet and lots of work — bring his compositions to life.
I first heard about Eric Whitacre on the TED video below.

http://embed.ted.com/talks/eric_whitacre_a_virtual_choir_2_000_voices_strong.html

Today, in the 4th Virtual Choir piece, there were 8,409 videos submitted featuring 5,905 singers from 101 countries. More and more people are attracted to this form of creative classical music.
I encourage you to visit Whitacre’s website and read the stories of singers who learned, rehearsed, and hummed their part in the creation of some of the most beautiful songs you’ll hear on the Internet.

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Here are a some related posts from this blog, and articles from the Support4Change website:

 

The Power of Introverts

July 19, 2012
“There’s zero correlation between being the best talker and having the best ideas.” – Susan Cain
 

TED

The introduction to a video from TED (ideas worth spreading) begins with:

In a culture where being social and outgoing are prized above all else, it can be difficult, even shameful, to be an introvert. But, as Susan Cain argues in this passionate talk, introverts bring extraordinary talents and abilities to the world, and should be encouraged and celebrated.

Our world prizes extroverts — but Susan Cain makes a case for the quiet and contemplative.

Whether extrovert or introvert, I recommend you watch the following:

The Power of Introverts

http://video.ted.com/assets/player/swf/EmbedPlayer.swf

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Did you enjoy this post?
Here are a some related posts from this blog, and articles from the Support4Change website:

 

Where is Your Circle of Caring?

June 27 2011
The popular phrase, “What goes around comes around,” is expressed in this inspiring story of a teenager and a teacher.

Ideas Worth Sharing

For me, the Internet is an absolutely fascinating resource for information and inspiration. And I have found that one of the greatest resources (outside of Wikipedia) is TED (Technology Entertainment and Design). This is a global set of conferences formed to disseminate “ideas worth spreading” where you can learn about a wide range of subjects that stretch the mind and touch the heart.

I like them so much that when I have limited time to pull together ideas for a post, or limited brain cells, I’ve decided to go to the TED website for inspiration. I will call these, and others that come along, “Ideas Worth Sharing.”

In any case, when I went there this morning I discovered a short video called A Circle of Caring.

It was given by Jok Church, who, according to Universal Uclick, receives more mail from children than anyone except Santa Claus. His comic strip Beakman & Jax was the inspiration for the television show Beakman’s World. And somehow during his career Church helped create a museum exhibit that has toured science centers and museums continually since 1998.

I knew nothing about him until a year ago when he presented a program called “Beckman on the Brain” at Caltech and came on stage wearing a wig and a lab coat. He had lots of unusual ways to show how the brain worked and was much appreciated by a large number of children and their enthusiastic parents.

This short TED video tells of how a teacher’s kindness was repaid years later. After the video, please consider the questions at the end of the post.

http://video.ted.com/assets/player/swf/EmbedPlayer.swf

Questions for you today:

What has someone done for you sometime in the past that you were able to repay either for that person, or for someone else?

What did you do for someone else that they repaid you in a similar way, or responded in kind to someone else?